Tea from the Land of the Morning Calm

The worst thing for a tea drinker is having to dip a teabag into tepid water! The number of times that I have been served some warm water with a sachet of Earl Grey; that’s not what you do to a cup of humanity


persian tea estekan micheleroohani

For me, Stakan Chai (a glass of tea in Russian—and Persian) is how tea (or chai) should be served: in a small transparent glass, no milk and definitely no lemon. Tea is, after water, the second most widely-consumed beverage in the world.

I was invited by Yoon Hee Kim to a Korean tea ceremony and here are some of the pictures:


korean tea ceremony micheleroohani yoon hee kim

“The chief element of the Korean tea ceremony is the ease and elegance of enjoying tea within an easy formal setting.” Here, Yoon Hee is preparing a green tea with amazing grace:


yoon hee kim preparing tea michele roohani

The ceremony was slow and tasteful (so unlike the rushed teas I prepare for myself) and the tea masters had beautiful fairies to help them,


korean tea ceremony yoon hee kim micheleroohani

and plenty of people to serve:


korean tea ceremony micheleroohani

As interesting as the actual ceremony was the parade of beautiful traditional Korean gowns or Hanboks:

jeogori michele roohani korean tea ceremony

My friend, Ock Ju explained that the different colors and styles indicated the wearer’s social status; some of the embroideries were breathtakingly beautiful.


jeogori korean embroideries micheler roohani

I love this 19th century painting I found in “The Book of Tea” about Persian women gathering around a samovar (samaavar):


19th century painting perisan women around a samovar michele roohani

To see some fabulous pictures of tea in different cultures, visit Yoon Hee’s site.